top of page
Search

Prepping for PR Part 3: Are You Sufficiently Social?


Silhouette of man hugging giant earth made up of individual faces
Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Does a buttoned up, conservative law firm need to be filming lip sync or choreographed dance videos on the latest app? Of course not; that law firm will probably focus primarily on LinkedIn.


A smaller, tech or entertainment law firm, on the other hand? Who knows?


There are no strict rules. Every small business' social media strategy will be subjective, and should flow directly from who and what that company is, and wants to be, in terms of both content and tone.


But while every small business doesn’t need to be on absolutely every social media platform, they should have at least a basic presence on the platforms that are relevant for their industry and market, and where their competitors and clients can also be found.


From a strict online 'real estate' perspective, creating even basic placeholder social media handles/profiles in your business' name will also keep other people from doing so, either innocently or for nefarious purposes.


What does this have to do with preparing for upcoming PR?


Even if you don't currently have the time or inclination to sustain a steady stream of original social media content, your social media platforms could still be providing you with valuable additional ‘PR pathways’ to amplify whatever basic messaging, news and/or announcements you are already otherwise generating and sharing, e.g., on your website, however sporadically.


Don't leave that potential PR on the table. Every little bit helps, including for SEO purposes. 


How to assess what social media platforms might be appropriate for your business


One way to gauge whether specific platforms might make sense for you is to do an audit of your main competitors, as well as other companies you aspire to compete with someday. On what platforms can they be found?


Once you find (and follow!) them, spend some time exploring what exactly they are doing there.

  • Are they sticking to the basics or getting creative?

  • Is their tone and content formal or informal, even possibly a bit playful, and does that seem different from their usual tone?

  • How are they appealing to and engaging with their followers?


Of course, you don't want to copy anyone else exactly, but this exercise can provide both creative inspiration and concrete 'evidence' to support future marketing decisions or convince others about this course of action.

This one's a little tougher to pull off, but if there's any way you can also get a sense of how and via what platforms your ideal customers/clients are using social media to influence their purchasing decisions—for example, by surveying them formally or informally—that would also be extremely valuable information. The goal is to meet your customers/clients wherever they are, so that they will have more of a chance to get to know you, and therefore want to buy from or retain you.


And the next time you announce news, whether you are simply posting it on your website or also sending a press release to the media, don't forget to amplify those efforts by sharing it to your social media platformsas well as any other communications vehicles you may utilize, such as email marketing or newsletters.


Think of it as a chorus. The people who follow you should be able to receive that news at roughly the same time as anyone else, wherever they happen to be looking at that particular time.


PR, by definition, is about getting social. So if you're realizing you've arguably been a bit "anti," it may be time to shake things up and get out there. And if you need some help with any aspect of this, reach out to us at bincubate@zamopr.com.



0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

コメント


bottom of page